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Aperture replacement
Sep 4th, 2014 by Ken Hagler

When looking at Adobe Lightroom as a possible replacement for Aperture, I quickly discovered that it wasn’t suitable. Lightroom just can’t handle the very large files produced by scanning large-format negatives, and I have a number of such files in my photo library. Fortunately, a bit of searching turned up an alternative. Years ago I had used a product called iView Media Pro to manage my photo library, but it was bought and promptly killed by Microsoft–which led to my using Aperture.

It turns out that at some point it was rescued from Microsoft by Phase One, a company best known for digital medium format cameras, and is now available once again. That made it an easy choice to go back to Media Pro as my Aperture replacement.

Aperture 3 finally works
Feb 14th, 2010 by Ken Hagler

Aperture 3 adds Faces, Places, and improved local adjustment.

After a long wait, Apple has released the next major update to its pro-class photo workflow application, Aperture 3. The new version boasts over 200 new features, including the addition of the successful facial recognition and geotagging features, Faces and Places, that were introduced with iPhoto ’09. Version 3 also adds edge-detecting adjustment brushes for non-destructive localized editing and touch-ups. Along with numerous UI and performance improvements, Aperture 3 adds full 64-bit support on supported systems running Snow Leopard.

Aperture has always had a focus on the workflow of professional photographers, but Apple also markets it for amateurs that want to move beyond the simplicity of iPhoto. Aperture 3 takes that even further, seemingly melding more power and advanced management with the features and ease of use of iPhoto.

Read the rest of this article...

[Ars Technica]

I’d been interested in Aperture since version two as a replacement for iView MediaPro, which was bought out and abandoned by Microsoft years ago. However, earlier versions of Aperture couldn’t handle the very large files produced by scanning 4×5 film (a slide produces a file around 1.25 GB) and would crash if you tried to add one. That problem has been fixed in version three–probably due to a combination of 64-bit support in Snow Leopard, and the fact that my Photoshop system has 24 GB of RAM.

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