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Some unsurprising news
Jan 20th, 2017 by Ken Hagler

Already on probation, Symantec issues more illegit HTTPS certificates [Ars Technica]

As someone who worked for Symantec for sixteen years, I am completely unsurprised by this. Symantec liked to boast of being a security company, but that’s never been anything but an advertising slogan. They’ve never really made any serious effort to be remotely secure.

Bad documentation writing
Apr 29th, 2010 by Ken Hagler

From the VMware Workstation manual:

Use virtual machines or system images created with products from other companies such as Norton, Symantec, and StorageCraft.

Someone isn’t very good at checking their facts. I do have to wonder how someone manages to find out that Symantec has a system imaging product without knowing that Norton is a Symantec brand name. You’d think the logo on the box or web site would be a clue.

Way to sabotage your former employer
Jan 28th, 2009 by Ken Hagler

Obama Looking To Symantec CEO For Commerce. patentpundit writes “Word has started to circulate that President Barack Obama may be close to appointing John W. Thompson, the outgoing chief executive of network security firm Symantec Corp., to be the next Secretary of Commerce. According to the LA Times, over the last several days Thompson has spoken on the telephone and met with key senators, and Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), a member of the commerce committee that would hold confirmation hearings for any appointed Secretary of Commerce, is ‘extremely supportive and hopeful he’ll be the nominee.’ The appointment of Thompson to head the Department of Commerce would be an exceptionally interesting choice given that only days ago President Obama asked Scott McNealy, a co-founder of Sun Microsystems, to lead his open source charge and conduct a study and report back regarding the feasibility of the US government forgoing proprietary software and moving toward open source software solutions.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slashdot]

I certainly hope this doesn’t happen, as it would be quite bad for the credibility of a company that specializes in security software if the former CEO goes to work for the single greatest threat to everyone’s security.

Because people are not ants
Jan 13th, 2009 by Ken Hagler

Open-plan offices make workers sick.

News.com.au: “Australian scientists have reviewed a global pool of research into the effect of modern office design, concluding the switch to open-plan has led to lower productivity and higher worker stress.”

Need to hire a really great programmer? Want a job that doesn’t drive you crazy? Visit the Joel on Software Job Board: Great software jobs, great people.

[Joel on Software]

I’m not surprised. It was Symantec’s decision to switch to an open office plan at their new Culver City facility that led to me working from home full-time, and on those rare occasions when I am in my assigned space there I find it almost impossible to accomplish anything that requires serious thought or concentration.

Patent trolls attack
Jan 9th, 2009 by Ken Hagler

Microsoft, Symantec, more sued over OS permissions patent.

A small Texas firm has filed a lawsuit against more than 20 companies, including Microsoft, AVG, and Novell, for violating its patents over data permissions and application authentication. It is unclear whether the firm may actually have a leg to stand on, but it certainly didn’t show restraint when picking who to face off against in court.

Read More…

[Ars Technica]

There’s another very similar story on Ars Technica: 36 companies named in parental control infringement lawsuit. These things are never really about damages–rather, the company holding the bogus patent (which invariably exists for the sole purpose of collecting bogus patents) sues some big company, estimates how much it will cost to fight the lawsuit, and then offers to settle. For example, let’s say that the patent trolls in Texas figure that it will cost Symantec five million dollars to fight the lawsuit (which everyone knows Symantec would win), so they offer to settle for $2.5 million. It’s basically a form of extortion which is legal in the US.

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